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Finding Your New Normals

Since March 2020, we have had to adapt our lives to new normals. For all of us, COVID19 has upset our daily routines, and our sense of freedom. Another result has been that we spend a lot more time isolated, either alone or with people we don’t always get along with. At Rapha Centre, we are trained to help people when they feel out of balance and “not normal”. 

Here are some ways we recommend coping with the current season (this too shall pass):

  • Being able to still talk with friends in your community or from Church is very important. Social distancing feels abnormal. It is important we still keep in touch, whether over the computer or by phone, with people we get support from. Consider regularly calling a family member or friend you have not talked to in a while.
  • Focus your attention on what you will remember about this pandemic when are look back on it. For example, imagine being a couple years from now and looking back on this time. What will you remember? The memories may bring out tears or laughter, but whatever comes up, try not to judge it. This is a weird and historic time for everybody.
  • Continue or start to do things you enjoy on a daily basis. The mind and body are deeply connected, so being able to stretch, take a walk, go fishing, or even watch re-runs of a show that makes you laugh over and over can help with moods. Try to limit how much alcohol or tobacco you have daily and find a new, healthy habit instead. 
  • Plan your day ahead of time. Making a list or getting a calendar to write down what you would like to accomplish in a day can help you focus on things we can control instead of things we cannot control.
  • Please reach out if you feel unsafe emotionally or too overwhelmed. Rapha Center offers safe in-office visits or tele-therapy and can help you process this off-balance time. 
Lando Rivas

Lando Rivas

Landon Rives (M.S. LPC-MHSP) has worked in mental health counseling for seven years in diverse treatment settings. He specializes in treating anxiety, depression, and addiction in adult populations and is especially interested in rural health care.

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